speaker-photo

Oscar Hokeah

Calling For a Blanket Dance

Oscar Hokeah is a citizen of Cherokee Nation and the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma from his mother’s side and has Latinx heritage through his father. He holds an MA in English with a concentration in Native American literature from the University of Oklahoma, as well as a BFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), with a minor in Indigenous Liberal Studies. He is a recipient of the Truman Capote Scholarship Award through IAIA and is also a winner of the Native Writer Award through the Taos Summer Writers Conference. His short stories have been published in South Dakota Review, American Short Fiction, Yellow Medicine Review, Surreal South, and Red Ink Magazine. He works with Indian Child Welfare in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. 

In the debut novel Calling for a Blanket Dance, an exploration of the power of tribalism and its never-ending task to heal residuals of colonial violence, Ever Geimausaddle faces a series of opportunities to either heal generational trauma or intensify it. Through the call from matrilocal Kiowa, Cherokee, and Mexican familial voices, he must make choices to either strengthen his tribal communities or become a predator to his own people. 

October 29, 11:30am - 12:30pm, Saturday

Speaker Schedule

Lan Samantha Chang + Oscar Hokeah

The Family Chao is a Dostoyevskian story of three brothers who must contend with their charismatic, domineering, and highly flawed father, and the legacy he leaves behind. Overlooked by the residents of Haven, Wisconsin, aside from their ability to concoct delicious Americanized Chinese dishes, the Chaos become embroiled in a restaurant succession drama that ultimately leads to the murder of the deeply troubled patriarch, Leo Chao, and the subsequent passing of the gentle, kind matriarch, Winnie, two deaths which draw the exacting gaze of the entire town.

In the debut novel Calling for a Blanket Dance, an exploration of the power of tribalism and its never-ending task to heal residuals of colonial violence, Ever Geimausaddle faces a series of opportunities to either heal generational trauma or intensify it. Through the call from matrilocal Kiowa, Cherokee, and Mexican familial voices, he must make choices to either strengthen his tribal communities or become a predator to his own people.

Sponsored in part by University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Ron Robinson Theater, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.